Just Add Data: University Professor Uses Novel Approach to Tackle Unhealthy Eating Epidemic

Posted by Knowlton Thomas

Poor food choices, such as overconsumption of carbonated soft drinks, are an important factor driving the global obesity epidemic and have been linked directly to diabetes and heart disease. But while public health agencies are working to help people to make healthier choices, monitoring the effectiveness of these efforts has been costly and difficult.

That may finally be changing thanks to a clever use of technology, however. Using the same digital data employed by marketers to promote food products, McGill University’s David Buckeridge has developed a way for health agencies to track Montreal consumers’ food choices on a neighbourhood level. According to Buckeridge, this novel approach could pave the way to better monitoring of consumers’ behavior and more targeted efforts to encourage healthier diets.

“We’ve taken data which most grocery and convenience stores generate with digital scanners to identify items at checkout. Companies use these data and produce information for marketing and other purposes," explains the public health physician and associate professor in the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health in the Faculty of Medicine. “We developed a way to use these data towards a positive public health initiative: routine monitoring of eating habits over time in particular pockets of a city to reveal which populations consume foods that can contribute to negative health outcomes.”

Buckeridge and his team measured monthly neighborhood-level purchases of soft drinks using digital data captured by store scanners in Montreal, Canada, between 2008 and 2010, then compared those results with census data describing detailed neighborhood socioeconomic characteristics. With this method, Buckeridge—who is also a member of the McGill Centre for the Convergence of Health and Economics—can isolate and measure any food choice, such as processed foods, salt-laden food and food containing saturated fat.

“We are working with public health agencies to determine how the methods we have developed can be used to monitor the food consumed within a neighborhood and develop strategies to encourage healthier diets," he says. "The evidence is clear that promoting healthy eating habits can prevent or reduce health problems, improve quality of life, and reduce health care costs."

The results of this research were published in the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences.

“We are aware that biological, geographical, environmental and economic factors as well as social influence impact what people eat," Buckeridge adds. "Monitoring and analysis of these factors is critical to inform efforts aimed at promoting healthy eating and preventing chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and cancer."

For each $10,000 decrease in median personal income, Buckeridge observed a fivefold increase in estimated monthly sales of soft drinks. “This indicates that in neighborhoods where families have lower incomes people tend to buy many more soft drinks as compared to neighborhoods where families have higher incomes,” he notes.

Though the link between food consumption and socioeconomics may seem obvious, Buckeridge affirms that these metrics provide accurate measurements over time—essential building blocks towards improving global health.

The same approach could be used to monitor meals purchased from restaurants and to measure total neighborhood consumption of dietary components, such as salt and sugar. “Using digital data in this application opens the door to monitor specific populations over time you could not previously,” he says. “It creates boundless research applications directly related to improving population health.”

Related Articles


blog comments powered by Disqus

Knowlton Thomas

Knowlton Thomas

Knowlton is the managing editor of Techvibes. Based in Vancouver, Knowlton has been published in national publications and has also appeared on television and radio. Previously he was an editor for New Westminster weekly The Other Press and served on its board of directors. When not working, Knowlton enjoys playing tennis or otherwise enjoying the outdoors. more



Who's Hiring



Recent Comments

Powered by Disqus