Canarie's Fibre Optic Cable Network is 60,000 Times Faster Than Average Household Broadband

Posted by Dan Verhaeghe

Canarie's network is so fast that you could download the entire iTunes movie catalogue in seven seconds. It’s so fast, and so cutting-edge, that it broke a world record for data transfer of 186 gigabytes per second at the SuperComputing 2011 conference.

The network now serves 24 cultural institutions, like the newly added Canada Science and Technology Museums Corporation, 89 universities, 101 colleges, 47 CEGEPS, 62 health networks, 127 provincial and federal government labs and research parks, and is part of 100-plus international peer networks in 100 countries—among other things. You can go here for a full list.

Canarie also secured $40 million in funding for the next two years, as announced in the 2012 Federal Budget in late March.

The Canada Science and Technology Museums Corporation is offering high-definition access to its collection of close to a million 3D and 2D objects. Denise Amyot, the CEO of Canada Science and Technology Museums Corporation, says that, “using the Canarie network, experts across Canada and around the world will share interactive, 3D, and high-definition video, and computer-aided designs in real-time."

"This is simply not possible over the regular Internet," she adds, "and our access to Canarie will help achieve a greater understanding of the many factors that contribute to Canada’s success in the science and technology fields and leadership in global innovation.”

Another example of how fibre technology is making inroads is from Toronto-based Redline Communications Group. They recently announced a major expansion of its machine-to-machine (M2M) network at a Shell Joint Venture Oil Field in Oman.

The company is the innovator of Virtual Fiber, a rugged broadband wireless solution used by companies and governments worldwide to cost-effectively deploy and manage distributed services and applications. In this particular example, 2,000 of 5,000 oil wells are now connected, which will eliminate the need for workers to drive from well to well. The oil field will eventually be completely connected.

As fibre-optic cable is used for a wider variety of options, President and CEO of Canarie Jim Roche says: “Most people know us as 'the internet for researchers,' but we offer much more than that. Canarie plays a significant role in allowing cultural and knowledge-sharing institutions to share anywhere in the world instantaneously. Distance becomes immaterial.”

The Globe and Mail reported in October that the percentage of homes with access to fibre optic connections is likely less than 2% and is restricted to Manitoba and Atlantic Canada. You can read more here about the challenges facing the rest of the provinces here.

Rogers has recently come out with new and upgraded fibre solutions for small businesses and the Toronto telco shows off its Canada-wide network here. However, the speed is only one gigabyte per second, and Bell’s Fibe Internet for consumers is only 25 megabytes per seconds on downloads. That’s a far cry from Canarie record-shattering performance.

Company:
CANARIE Inc.
Website:
http://www.canarie.ca
Location:
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

CANARIE Inc. - Canada's advanced Internet development organization - is a not-for-profit corporation supported by its members, project partners and the Federal Government. CANARIE's mission is to accelerate Canada's advanced Internet development and use by facilitating the widespread adoption of faster, more efficient networks and by enabling the next generation of advanced products, applications and services to... more


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Dan Verhaeghe

Dan Verhaeghe

Dan Verhaeghe focuses on marketing, mobile, major technology players, entertainment, and new media. Dan has a dozen years of online experience that dates back to the turn of the millennium where he dominated a now non-existent online RPG game for a couple of years at the age of 15. He would eventually become a Toronto Blue Jays blogger who earned his way into Toronto's CP24 studios six years... more




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