INcubes Accelerator Demo Day Sees Hovr, Event Holler, and More Present

Posted by Dan Verhaeghe

The second-ever INcubes Demo Day at the TMX building in downtown Toronto featured startups that have ideas likely to be attractive to venture capitalists.

The accelerator was started by Internet mavericks Ben Zlotnick and A. Traviss Corry, who have been around since the early 1990s in the digital media space. The event featured startups accelerating in online retail, sports, tech entertainment, and for event promoters in social media.

Unlike incubators and accelerators that hold startups for six months to a year, INcubes puts on the pressure. The chosen startups are from 100 or more applications this time around are told they must ready themselves for potential investors in just three months. Further, 80 to 90 potential mentors came to INcubes doors. All companies are seeking venture capital in the hundreds of thousands.

The first startup, Hovr, is the "easiest way to comparison shop online." There are over 40 million women a day that spend hours a day on Pinterest liking the latest styles, trends, and more. Hovr makes the images people come across clickable through one simple update of your Internet browser.

You can then jump out to a comparative retailer list of where you can purchase the product. The company says that online retail is a $170 billion market. Hovr takes a 5% commission.

Second, Nicholas Murphy’s GameDay Interactive is about the second screen experience with your smartphone or tablet while watching live sports. Canadians are engaged in the second screen experience: 88% of tablet and smartphone owners use their device while watching TV according to research firm Nielsen. The app includes real-time live game quizzes, real-time stats, extremely popular fantasy sports leagues, videos, sponsor messages and more. 

Third, Event Holler is promoter-powered event management. Anyone can become a promoter and make money through the event links they share. It’s essentially a network of promoters based on revenue sharing.

People are very active on social media in Toronto, in the hundreds of thousands. Event Holler can become the destination of choice for any venue, music group, adventure company, organizations, artists, and more who want to sell their tickets. Currently many nightclub and event promoters turn to services like Facebook Events, LinkedIn Events, Eventbrite, and Meetup.com. 

Last but not least there is MyGoodNight. There are always photos being taken at nightclubs in bars across the world. MyGoodNight is aggregating those photos and videos from Facebook and other sources on to master websites for entertainment companies and Toronto nightlife enthusiasts.

That’s because if you are not in the know, finding out where to go and what to do online can be hard. Planning is often from unrecognized sources, is not up-to-date, and scattered. Third party websites are also tedious, time consuming, and costly to maintain.

People will also receive up-to-date information relevant to them, can use the “My Night” tool to plan a night out, and share with friends. There are three million Canadians between 18 and 35 that go out regularly. They already have established networks in cities across the world and say their experienced team can penetrate new markets quickly and easily. 

Company:
Event Holler
Website:
http://www.eventholler.com
Location:
Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Event management software market is dominated by a few expensive ticketing systems and does not address the most important problem, promotion. We think that there is a huge demand for a ticketing platform in the market that can solve an organizer's biggest problem "how to sell tickets?" The solution; tell the whole city about it with $0 in advertising cost. more


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Dan Verhaeghe

Dan Verhaeghe

Dan Verhaeghe focuses on marketing, mobile, major technology players, entertainment, and new media. Dan has a dozen years of online experience that dates back to the turn of the millennium where he dominated a now non-existent online RPG game for a couple of years at the age of 15. He would eventually become a Toronto Blue Jays blogger who earned his way into Toronto's CP24 studios six years... more



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