Vancouver's PlentyofFish Dismisses Lawsuit: 'We Dealt With This Already'

Posted by Techvibes NewsDesk

Vancouver-based online dating site PlentyofFish is being sued by the parents of a dead American soldier. The parents say that their son's photograph was used for online personal ads four years after he was kill in Iraq. But POF does not necessarily agree.

POF, which was recently named one of the world's most valuable startups, says the lawsuit is a nonstarter. Spokesman Paul Bloudoff told The Canadian Press that the company did not advertise online in America in December. He also noted that "hundreds of thousands" of third parties advertise via POF every month, and that the company does not control or monitor the content of the ads. 

Even though the Vancouver business is not at fault, it has blocked the ad from its network as a favour to the grieving parents. "We dealt with this matter a month ago," Paul stated in an email. "In our opinion, this case should not have been filed."

Company:
PlentyOfFish (POF.com)
Website:
http://www.pof.com
Location:
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

PlentyOfFish is the world’s largest online dating site, with over 80 million registered users. Beginning as a small start-up out of CEO and founder Markus Frind’s apartment in 2003, it soon revolutionized the online dating industry as the first free site. Since its inception, PlentyOfFish has offered the first and most advanced matching system in the industry and a series of personalized relationship tests for... more


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Techvibes NewsDesk

Techvibes NewsDesk

Techvibes is Canada's leading technology media property.Founded in 2002, Techvibes covers technology and business news that impacts Canadians. We combine breaking local news with international coverage to deliver a unique balance of insight and information. The Techvibes Newsdesk covers a broad beat and publishes general news stories. If you have a story you would like covered, email... more




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